Gallery of our Kung Fu and Martial Arts Training

Take a look at martial arts training in Calgary.

You can get an view into the day to day training at the Science of Kung Fu. We train everything from weapons to self defense and have a lot of fun doing it.

The first weapons form (or kata) students encounter in the adult Bak Fu Pai curriculum at The Science of Kung-fu is Twin Spirit Blades or Bak Fu Suang Gwai Do designed by Master Vincent Peppers. This exciting set of movements goes a long way in teaching the practitioner complex circular patterns and angles when using dual sabres (or more pragmatic, machetes) in combat. It is in this form where the principle of a weapon being merely an extension of the physical self in concert with the mind driven by spiritual energies (or chi) is introduced. In turn, the dual sabre weaponry utilized in this form also has a deep mystical significance as ancient practitioners wielded these weapons in an effort to ward off malevolent spirits and ghosts henceforth the title of the form, Twin Spirit Blades.

The second weapons form (or kata) students will encounter in the adult Bak Fu Pai curriculum at The Science of Kung-fu is the White Tiger Staff or Bak Fu Gwan Do form designed by Fong Doe Duk in the 1600s. This ancient compilation of movements provides an extensive foundation in long weapons training. There is no doubt that the proficient wielding of a staff will keep multiple opponents at a non-threatening distance. There is however a deeper understanding that must be acquired through internal kung-fu to be truly dangerous and even lethal with this instrument. The whip of the tiger's hip, spring of the dragon's back, and snap of the crane heel must work together to transmit destructive chi through the staff and into it's intended target. The principle of a weapon being merely an extension of the physical self in concert with the mind driven by spiritual energies (or chi) is continued in this setting.

The third weapons form (or kata) students will encounter in the adult Bak Fu Pai curriculum at The Science of Kung-fu is the White Tiger Long Knife (Sabre) or Bak Fu Dan Dao form designed by Fong Doe Duk in the 1600s. In China, the sabre is considered one of the four traditional weapons of kung-fu, along with the staff, spear, and sword. Moreover, it is often depicted as "The General of All Weapons". The sabre is designed with a single edge although many sabres have several inches of edge on the guild side near the tip to aid in more effective thrusting and deeper piercing into its intended target. The hallmark feature of the sabre is it's pronounced yet moderate curve which provides a longer edge for more efficacious slashing and cutting than it's sword counterpart. There is no doubt that the sabre, in the hands of an experienced practitioner, is truly a very lethal weapon. It is however important that the student fully understands yielding and dissolving principles of traditional kung-fu before attempting to become proficient with this weapon. The in-depth understanding of a weapon being merely an extension of the physical self in concert with the mind driven by spiritual energies (or chi) is once again continued in this setting of weapons training.

The fourth weapons form (or kata) students will encounter in the adult Bak Fu Pai curriculum at The Science of Kung-fu is the White Tiger Spear or Bak Fu Qiang Do form designed by Fong Doe Duk in the 1600s. Given its relative ease to manufacture, the spear was one of the most popular weapons of the Chinese battlefield in the pre-modern era. Significant features of the spear are its length and a red horse-hair tassel lashed below a lethal diamond-shaped blade at its tip. The spear length varies from 7 feet used in today's martial arts studios to 30 feet used in battle several hundred years ago. The spear blade at the tip is shaped like a diamond to elicit maximum damage when thrust with rotation. The spear makes a small wound when it enters its target however as it turns during penetration, the wider part of the diamond shape enlarges the size of the wound and in turn induces severe tissue destruction and massive blood loss. When the spear is moving quickly, the red tassel aids in blurring the vision of the opponent so it is more difficult for him to block or grab the spear. The tassel also prevents the flow of blood to the wooden shaft where it could make it more difficult for the practitioner to maintain a solid grip on the weapon. The spear is truly a lethal weapon in the hands of an internal kung-fu practitioner who is able to propagate and wield a power base known as ging. This internal power is rooted in the feet, developed in the legs, directed by the waist, and expressed at contact as one explosive force. The in-depth understanding of a weapon being merely an extension of the physical self in concert with the mind driven by spiritual energies (or chi) is once again continued in this setting of weapons training.

This album contains 4 galleries outlining some basic exercises that will benefit martial arts training.


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